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In a vase on Monday

Sweet peas still rule in my garden this week.  To be honest, there's not much else at the moment - it's a betwixt and between time!  The sweet pea plants I have been growing in big pots are not as prolific as those in the ground, but I have been able to pick several posies through the week, and I am going to enjoy them as much as I can, for as long as I can!

I think the fabulous colour of the ruby red sweet pea teams well with three little wild cherry plums I picked from a hedgerow, during a walk the other day.

Comments

  1. If you a jam maker, these cherry plums make the best flavoured plum jam ever..but you have to remove all the stones after the initial cooking of the fruit. I can just imagine the smell from the sweet peas., love the colours.

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    1. Ah ha - good tip! I might go and forage for some more! Our little plum tree is quite laden with fruit, but I love jam making so there's always room for more jars on the shelf! Thank you! A

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  2. Gorgeous sweet peas, Amanda - after the demise of my 'winter' ones I am largely sweet pea-less, as my summerones never do very well. Next season though I am not going to sow them early and overwinter them, as one packet I acquired and sowed in the spring have done far better than any of my October sown ones have done. Interesting to read about the cherry plums making such good jam - I imagine a cherry stoner would destone these quite well. I bought one easily and cheaply from eBay. They are such a gorgeous colour and tactile shape, aren't they?

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    1. I love the little cherry plums! There were also quite a lot of wild yellow plums along that hedgerow (photo in my post Cabbages, plums and butterflies), but they were a slightly different shape, a bit more elongated. I ate one of those and it was pleasantly sweet! Have a good week in your garden. A

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  3. Nothing sweeter than sweet peas in a vase!

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    1. Couldn't agree more! I am really pleased with the colours this year - not to many white or very pale ones. I love the rich jewel colours of these! A

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  4. I adore your sweet peas and so wish I could hang on to mine into summer. They're winter/early spring bloomers here.

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    1. The sweet peas are certainly one of our summer flower to treasure! That gorgeous scent and all the different colours. So pretty! Yours will come round again all too soon! Time passes that fast! A x

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  5. Oh I love sweet peas. Mine did not do well due to the rabbits who seemed to prefer them for the first time. Yours are stunning. Popping over to visor from In A Vase On Monday on Cathy's blog.

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    1. There are so many fabulous Monday vases with the fantastic array of summer flowers! Aren't we lucky to see them all - from California to Caledonia!

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