Skip to main content

This summer's last hurrah in vases on Monday

Our tiny garden is remarkably colourful at the moment, with some pink cosmos, asters, rudbeckia, nepeta, gaura The Bride, and a few afterthought roses, but for today's vases I have picked out the summer's last hurrah.  A gentle little collection which we have been enjoying all summer long.  We had our first frost last week so I don't think it will be long before these pretties get knocked on the head by Jack Frost.  Therefore, in the spirit of 'gather ye rosebuds while ye may', here is our garden's offering for this week.
 Thank you to these little beauties, for all the joy they bring.

Comments

  1. So delicate and beautiful...almost a wistful look back at summer...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's that time of year isn't it! The summer garden brings such a wonderful sense of light when flowers are cut and brought into the house. All that goes during winter, which I feel is galloping towards us at the moment. Quite a few of our native trees are heavy with berries - holly, rowan, hawthorn - which country folk will tell you is the sign of a bad winter. Already they are forecasting a return of the beast from the east in the New Year. The signs are there, so the remnants of summer are very precious, and yes, it is a bit of a wistful look back! Thank you for visiting the running wave today. A

      Delete
  2. Lovely fresh flowers in a happy mix of colors. I love your nasturtiums. Have a good week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Susie. Not sure how long the nasturtiums will keep going. We had a light frost last week, and they don't take much before they will sink in a big soggy heap! Hopefully we will have them for a little bit longer! I hope you have a good week too. A

      Delete
  3. Oh that is a really loud HURRAH and what a delightful vase they make, defying autumn and your first frost. Isn't it exciting having sweet peas still - I just pulled the last of mine up yesterday

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My sweet peas have been wonderful but now is the time to say goodbye! There are a few hopefully buds left, but they won't come to anything I don't think so when I get time this week I will pull the plants out! They will leave a big hole in the flower bed! A

      Delete
  4. I love the happy colors of your vases, Amanda. Coastal Southern California is exempt from the abrupt change of seasons brought on by frost - I expect it would make me melancholy. But colder weather also allows you to grow things I can't so there are definitely trade-offs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. INAVOM certainly demonstrates the wide range of plants we can grow in our gardens in our various countries, and these differences seem to be highlighted as we move from one season into another! We all have such difference growing conditions - and doesn't that make it exciting! A

      Delete
  5. I love a mix of what's going on outside brought inside. Enjoy! and Sweet Peas to boot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, me too, I love all these things. A mix of colour, shape and size! The last of the sweet peas, sadly, but I've learnt this year to concentrate on the darker colours with just a few pastel shades. I have enjoyed them much more!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Coastal walk from Gullane to North Berwick

By the time I have walked about four miles, my toes are screaming at me - it's the arthritis, you see.  One of the joys of being that little bit older than I was.  However, for a long time, I have been keen to walk along the beaches, and follow the coastal path, between Gullane and North Berwick. So, having worked out the tide times, I decided today was the day, and off we went. Below is our starting point, the bay at Gullane.  It's a lovely beach, very popular with dog walkers. This is looking east, the direction Tilly and I were going to take. Looking back, up the Forth, the unmistakable bulk of Arthur's Seat, and Edinburgh's skyline, just clear enough to see. For most of the walk, there is the choice between wandering along a series of beaches, or following a path along the top of each. There's no denying it, at heart I am a shell-seeker.  I have loads of shells at home.  We lived on one of the out islands in the Bahamas for a just over a year, a lo

Colonsay postcards - on arrival

The first thing I do, once we have unpacked our car, which has been groaning with all the stuff we need for a week's stay in the holiday cottage, is head for the outer gardens of Colonsay House. It is a place of wonder for me! I particularly love the leaves of the giant rhododendrons. There are many different varieties, all planted in the early 1930s. The outer gardens are generally overgrown, having had little tending over the decades. That makes them even more magical! The old woodmill falls apart a little more every year, but that's fine by me because I love corrugated iron and especially if it's rusted! And of course the bees. Colonsay's beekeeper, Andrew Abrahams, has one of his apiaries on the edge of the pine wood. So lovely - the hum of busy bees and the heady smell of the pines. We are here - finally! Delayed by four months by the wretched virus, but now I am on holiday! Hooray!

In a vase on Monday - colour

The intense colours in my vase this week come from nasturtiums, sweetpeas and a single glorious zinnia! Their beauty and love of life speak for themselves and need no further words from me! Enjoy!