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A fairy vase on Monday

There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that my enduring love of wild flowers was engendered by Cicely Mary Barker's Flower Fairy books.  I have got them all.  Had them all my life.  I have very old editions, which were originally my mother's and date from the 1920s, and I have a collection given to me as a Christening present by an aunt, and I have more recently editions, which I bought when my daughter was young.  I can't resist them.

When I think of the flower fairies, the first one which comes to mind, every time, is the adorable, chubby little figure of the White Clover Fairy.  She is one of the Flower Fairies of the Summer, appearing first in 1923.  Here she is, in all her summer finery.
This time next year, if all goes well, I will have a beehive or two, and the White Clover Fairy, who reigns supreme around here at the moment, is going to be my bees new best friend!


Comments

  1. I've never read those books but sure have heard a lot about them and they sound delightful. White clover is one of my favorites too. It smells so nice and yes, your bees will adore them! :)

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    1. Ah, then if you can find them, you have a treat in store! The Flower Fairy books are something special. Adorable illustrations, without being sugary, and very informative for the child and adult! I learnt how to identify so many wild flowers from these books, from a very young age! A

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  2. Your photo, with the shadows on the table, is perfect. And the connection to your childhood reading - and you still have the book! - is very cool. We recieved two bee hives earlier this month...it's quite an experience to be near them - all the buzzing...

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    1. I am very interested to hear that you have become beekeepers! I have been to a couple of terms of classes on beekeeping, including an unscheduled swarm during one class - I did a post about that a couple of months ago! A

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  3. Even though you only have the one type of flower you have such depth in your post. I am amazed at eh number of flowers so unfamiliar to me even though I have been doing this for a few moons.

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    1. Thank you very much for your comment on the post! Much appreciated. A

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  4. I have never heard of these books but I love the page you have shared with us. I also love clover so your vase full is quite beautiful to me. It has brought back fond memories of making necklaces, crowns, rings and bracelets from the clover flowers when I was a child. So many children don't know the fun of it anymore due to the "lawn" obsession of so many people. Happy IAVOM.

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    1. I used to make daisy chains as necklaces and crowns! I know what you mean about 'lawn obsession', sadly applied far too keenly to roadside verges, where grass cutting at the wrong time of year has destroyed so many wild flowers. Check out the website of wild flower charity Plantlife. They are great campaigners trying to save our wildflowers. A

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  5. I'm very fond of clover myself, although I'm afraid I've let it get out of hand in my own garden, to the extent that it began engulfing other plants before I came to their rescue. The flower is remarkably pretty, especially when viewed close-up.

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    1. It is a delightful plant but I do agree that it is very keen on romping through a flowerbed! I love its sweet smell - just like honey! Yum! A

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  6. Oh, I loved those pictures and still do. I often look at a flower and think it looks like a fairy hat. Good luck with the bees. What a great thing to do.

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    1. Yes, looking forward to being a beekeeper, although I do find the responsibility rather onerous - all of sudden our family will have expanded by another 50,000 members! It's the winter time that worries me, making sure they have enough food to keep them going! Anyway, that's some way off! Still lots to learn before then! A

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