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In a vase on Monday - stripes and complementary colours

It's the first week of July and the garden is doing its very best to be glorious.  The weather has other ideas.  Cold strong winds, pulses of heavy rain and general unkindness is being wreaked upon our beautiful summer flowers.  In occasional moments of calm on Sunday I picked material for today's two little vases.  Rosa Mundi, which features on her own because she is so lovely, and in the other vase orange calendula and nasturtium, complementary blue centaurea montana - all self-sown from last year, and yellow hypericum.
One of the joys of rose petals is that you can dry them and the memory of those beautiful blooms can linger on for a while!

Comments

  1. I love the pop of blue with the yellow and orange! It's always interesting how colors play off each other. And Rosa Mundi is gorgeous. She is a "stand alone" kind of lady for sure.
    I'm sorry you're having such cold, nasty weather. We are having the extreme opposite, and right now, I would give anything for a cold blast of wind and some rain. As far out as the forecast goes, it is more of the same here. Can we trade places?

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    1. Thank you Cindy. We do have some sunshine at the moment, but still with a cool wind. A pretty good combination really! I might moan a bit about cold weather in July but to be honest I don't really like very hot weather, especially if it's humid too! I had enough of that when we lived in the Bahamas for just over year, many years ago! So many thanks for the offer, but I won't take you up on your offer of trading places!! Have a good week. A

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  2. Isn't that rose pretty? It always makes me think of stirring raspberry puree into cream - such a gorgeous soft shade of pink. Is the first flush of centaurea - mine finished blooming a while ago but will have the occasional bloom in a second flush, but my nasturtium have only just started! You have your own bright contrasts today Amanda, albeit on a different scale to my dahlias - thanks for sharing them

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    1. I love your thought of swirling raspberry puree and cream - it is the perfect Rosa Mundi!! The blue centaurea is self-seeded. I have no idea where it came from. I have a big centaurea which is a very dark purple colour but that seemed to have a nasty affliction this year and I have cut it right back. The blue one is an invader but I have always loved the colour. Perfect complementary colour for orange!!

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  3. Gorgeous! I mistook the roses for camellias. The orange vase is very summery and appealing.

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    1. Thank you Susie. You are right - the rose is very camellia-like, now you come to mention it! A

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  4. I don't usually care for the variegated roses but I love your Rosa Mundi. I'd hate to see her battered too but at least you can enjoy the fragrant petals for a longer period. I'm sorry you're having a stretch of nasty weather and I hope sunnier skies are ahead.

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    1. I do enjoy the stripey roses - they remind me of the old Dutch masters paintings of elaborate vases of flowers! I am not, however, keen on variegated foliage, with one or two exceptions! Rosa Mundi is a pretty little lady and she is coping very well with our horrid summer weather. I think our summer came and went in May!!

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  5. The blue Centaurea really makes the other colours pop! Lovely combination. ��

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    1. Thank you Cathy. The centaurea really is a lovely blue - a real sapphire! A

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  6. Oh Rosa Mundi is such a unique rose Amanda and with such an interesting history. I have never seen her in the flesh as it were but I imagine that she looks even more beautiful than in photos. I am nodding my head in agreement with the last sentence of your reply to Kris. Here the rain has arrived earlier than predicted this morning which is even more frustrating!

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    1. You have now whet my appetite to read up on Rosa Mundi! Thank you :o) ! A

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