Sunday, 2 April 2017

Daffy-down-dilly

I think that the sun is shining throughout the UK today.  It's coming and going a bit, with large clouds getting in the way, but generally a very sunny Sunday.  

The dogs and I have had a good walk this morning, and the countryside is greening up nicely.
The daffodil season can't last long enough for me.  I love them.  I am reliably informed that as a very small child I picked the heads off every plant in the garden, to present to my mother.  That didn't go down too well.  
Then, later in life, as a young teenager, with little money in her pocket, my father would take me to two places where I knew wild daffodils grew and I would pick Mum a bunch for her birthday on 27 April.  

These days I spend the daffodil days rescuing bunches of long-harvested buds from a lingering death in supermarkets, buying them for knockdown prices.  I also collect up the ragged and wilting blooms which get picked or kicked and strewn along pathways by young hooligans, who don't seem to appreciate that these plants have stalwartly followed their calling to emerge from underground at the end of winter, and eventually produce a proud and joyous flower, which heralds the arrival of a new springtime.  Over several weeks I have a raggle taggle collection of daffodils lined up on my kitchen worktop, where I hope they know they have been appreciated and enjoyed after all.

4 comments:

  1. Love the idea of you rescuing all those daffys that have been pulled up!

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    1. Yes, I can't bear to see them lying on the ground, after all the effort they have made to come up and then bloom. When we lived in Edinburgh it enraged me to see all the broken stems throughout banks of narcissus growing in nearby parkland, where the local schoolchildren had just waded through the middle of the sea of yellow! So, I have my own little daffodil ward in the kitchen and they reward me by recovering, albeit tattered and torn, but still smiling! Hope you have a sunny day wherever you are. A

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  2. I love daffodils too - I think they are my favourite flower, because they signal the end (hopefully) of the dark days and the promise of sunlight to come. Yellow is such a joyful colour and our Cornish lanes are full of flowery sunshine at present - celandines, primroses, wild daffodils, gorse (oh the gorse is wonderfully abundant this year)all lining the banks which border the lanes. Then there's the smell of wild garlic . . mmmm . . . and the coconut/vanilla smell of that gorse. It's a real treat to wander the lanes.

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    1. That sounds delish! I love the smell of gorse - gently spicy and, as you say, coconutty. Wonderful.

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